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Images database - Browsing Names (Creator, contributor) - 'Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin' (29 found) Mark 
1.
(Thumbnail) Fall of Table Rock from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Fall of Table Rock from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  On January 19, 1887, the Niagara Falls Gazette reported; " Wednesday night last a large section of rock on the Canadian side, close to the Horseshoe Fall, fell with a deafening crash and jarring the earth for some distance away. The exact position of the break, which was 150 feet (46 metres) long and 60 feet (18 metres) wide, was the point visitors will recall. It was close to the Horseshoe falls and protected by an iron railing. So little remains of the once famous Table Rock that it can hardly retain its name. It originally extended out so far that a person on the edge stood directly in front of a portion of the Horseshoe Falls. In 1818 a mass 160 feet (49 metres) by 30 or 40 feet (9 to 12 metres) in width fell. In the winter of 1828 and 1829 several large masses fell leaving the table-shaped ledge without support on the North and South sides. About mid-day on June 26th, 1850, this table fell with a terrible crash which startled inhabitants in the vicinity, the first impression being that an earthquake had occurred. It is said that a solitary stableman who was washing an omnibus on the rock escaped with his life, the vehicle, of which no traces were ever found, falling into the abyss. In 1862, several pieces of rock were blasted off as a prevention of accident." In 1897 other pieces broke off, leaving Table Rock as only a slight projection. Finally in 1935 what was left of the overhang was blasted off as a safety precaution. Table Rock remains today in name only.
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504831  Scan from book     
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2.
(Thumbnail) Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  This map shows the Great lakes in the period just before the present level of flow began. Again the Falls of Niagara cut a narrow section of gorge - Stage IV Whirlpool Rapids. N- Nipissing Outlet; o - Ottawa River; T- Trent Valley
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504819  Scan from book     
D504819A  Scan from book     
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3.
(Thumbnail) Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  The five stages of the gorge: I - Lesiston Branch Gorge (Lewiston Spillway Gorge); II - Old Narrow Gorge (Erie Gorge); III - Lower Great Gorge; IV - Whirlpool Rapids Gorge; V - Upper Great Gorge. The corresponding line alongside the river outline separated by white space denotes the high bank of the river during its various stages.
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504825  Scan from book     
D504825A  Scan from book     
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4.
(Thumbnail) Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Five Stages of the Gorge from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  The Falls of Niagara had only a fraction of their usual flow during cutting of Old Erie Gorge, Stage II on the map. This period is much the longest in the history of the Falls. A- lake Algonquin; M- Mohawk Valley; T- Trent Valley; I- Lake Iroquois
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504844  Scan from book     
D504844A  Scan from book     
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5.
(Thumbnail) Formation of the Sediment Beds from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Formation of the Sediment Beds from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  The light areas on the map represent dry land during the Silurian period of the Palaeozoic Era. The Palaeozoic Era was the geological era containing the oldest forms of highly organized life, including reptiles and seed-bearing plants, dating back from 500 million to 350 million years ago. The Silurian Period, dates back 430 to 390 million years. Niagara District sedimentary deposits, mostly sandstone, shale and marine limestone, were laid down in the Silurian Period. This is the third period in geological time during the Palaezoic Era.
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504823  Scan from book     
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6.
(Thumbnail) The Former lake Bed from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title The Former lake Bed from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  This map was drawn from information contained in the United States Geological Survey of 1913. Ancient lake Tonawanda shows as merely an enlarged Niagara River which spilled over the 644 kilometres (400 miles) wscarpment at five main points - Holley, Medina, Gasport, Lockport and Lewiston in present day New York State. The Lewiston outlet prevailed to become the only outlet - the Niagara River
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504837  Scan from book     
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7.
(Thumbnail) Former Outlets of the Great lakes from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Former Outlets of the Great lakes from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  This sketch shows the former outlets of the Great lakes before the Falls cut back to the Glen. The arrow represents the slow retreat of the melting glacier, over a period of thousands of years. When the glacier was north of District "A" on the map, the easiest course for the melt waters was the Nipissing-Ottawa Outlet. When the surface of the land along this outlet rose after the weight of the glacier was removed from it, a new and lower passage for lake drainage opened up at "B", through Lake Simcoe and the Trent Valley System on to Lake Iroquois. The dotted area marked "E" shows the approximate size of the small Lake Erie whose waters formed stage II, the Old narrow or Erie Gorge. Modern lake Erie is shown at "C".
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504840  Scan from book     
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8.
(Thumbnail) Future of the Falls from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Future of the Falls from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  In the 30.6 kilometres (19 miles) between the Lockport Limestone at Goat island and the Onandaga Limestone at Buffalo, the types of bedrock will cause the cataract to change a great deal. In the sketch, S= Silurian Age sea-beds composed of: I, Salina Limestone; II, Lockport Limestone; III, Clinton and Median shale and limestone formations; D, Devonian Age limestones which form the escarpment through Buffalo and which prevent Lake Erie from draining almost completely into the Niagara River; G, end of Goat island. The Falls will be much higher after cutting through the terraces of the ancient buried Falls-Chippawa valley; R, near here, at the southern end of Navy island, the Falls with either become a terraced cataract, like Letchworth Lower Falls, or will become a rapids because of the soft Salina shales which form most of the bed of the Upper Niagara River; P, Peace Bridge, where there now are rapids of a sort and the future site of another small cataract when the level of the Niagara River is gradually lowered by the falls cutting through the shales at "R".
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504841  Scan from book     
D504841A  Scan from book     
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9.
(Thumbnail) Glacial Drift Dufferin Islands from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title Glacial Drift Dufferin Islands from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  Point "A" on the map marks the position of the first ridge of the ancient Falls-Chippawa valley, which diverted the water of the Niagara River toward the bank, to form the Dufferin islands embayment. The water of the embayment channel returns to the river along the edge of the lower cascade at "B". The curve on the map between points "B" and "C" was formed when the water level of the river was higher and the Falls was near Hubbard Point.
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504833  Scan from book     
D504833A  Scan from book     
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10.
(Thumbnail) The Hubbard Point Caves from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin (image/jpeg)
Title The Hubbard Point Caves from "Our Romantic Niagara" by A.H. Tiplin
Creator  Astrid Akkerman from a sketch by A.H. Tiplin
Type  Still Image
Collection  Niagara Falls Public Library Digital Collections
Notes  Bender's cave was surveyed by Scott A. Ensinger and H.E. Krog in January 1978. The numerals on this and the following sketches represent height inside the caves, in feet. The approaches to these caves are dangerous and caution is advised to those who would attempt to explore them without rock climbing equipment.
Date  1988
Physical items 
Filing No.   Format       
D504838  Scan from book     
D504838A  Scan from book     
D504838B  Scan from book     
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29 records found in Images database.  Displaying 1 to 10.
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